European Region of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association

Glossary beginning with E

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E

European Asylum Support Office (EASO) search for term

The EASO acts as a centre of expertise on asylum. It supports Member States in their efforts to implement a more consistent and fair asylum policy. It provides technical support to Member States and the European Commission, as well as operational assistance to countries facing particular pressures. The EASO is based in Valletta, Malta. (sub-item of European Union (EU))

European Commission (EC) search for term

The European Commission is the executive body of the European Union. It is responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU. The EC is appointed for a five year period by agreement between the EU countries, subject to approval by European Parliament. The Commission acts with complete political independence. It is assisted by a civil service made up of 36 "Directorates-General" (DGs) and services, based mainly in Brussels and Luxembourg. (sub-item of European Union (EU))

European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) search for term

is an international treaty to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms in Europe. (sub-item of Council of Europe)

European Council search for term

The European Council consists of the heads of state or government of the EU countries, together with its President and the President of the Commission. It defines the overall general political direction and priorities of the European Union. (sub-item of European Union (EU))

European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) search for term

Composed of one judge from each of the 47 member states. It makes judgments in respect of possible violations of the European Convention on Human Rights. Where the Court finds that a particular member state has violated the Convention, the government is obliged to take corrective action. (sub-item of Council of Europe)

European External Action Service (EEAS) search for term

Abroad, the EU is represented by a network of 136 EU Delegations, which have a similar function to those of an embassy. This is being coordinated by the European External Action Service which serves as a foreign ministry and diplomatic corps for the EU under the authority of the High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (HR), a post created by the Treaty of Lisbon. (sub-item of European Union (EU))

European Parliament search for term

The European Parliament is the elected body that represents the EU's citizens. It currently seats 751 national representatives. Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are elected every five years. As an equal partner with the Council of the European Union, the European Parliament passes the majority of EU laws. (sub-item of European Union (EU))

European Union (EU) search for term

The European Union is an economic and political union of European countries. There are currently 28 EU Member States.

Important institutions, bodies or charters:

Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union: The European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights sets out in a single text the range of civil, cultural, political, economic and social rights of all persons resident in the EU. The Lisbon Treaty, which came into force in 2009, made the Charter legally binding.

Council of the European Union: The Council is, together with the European Parliament, one of the legislative institutions of the EU. Each EU country in turn presides over the Council for a six-month period. One minister from each of the Member States attends every Council meeting. Formerly known as the 'Council of Ministers', it is often only referred to as 'the Council'.

Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU): The CJEU is the judiciary of the EU. It reviews the legality of the acts of the institutions of the EU, ensures that Member States comply with their obligations under the treaties, and interprets EU law at the request of national courts and tribunals. The Court is composed of one judge from each EU country, assisted by eight advocates-general. The Court of Justice of the European Union is located in Luxembourg.

European Asylum Support Office (EASO): The EASO acts as a centre of expertise on asylum. It supports Member States in their efforts to implement a more consistent and fair asylum policy. It provides technical support to Member States and the European Commission, as well as operational assistance to countries facing particular pressures. The EASO is based in Valletta, Malta.

European Commission (EC): The European Commission is the executive body of the European Union. It is responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU. The EC is appointed for a five year period by agreement between the EU countries, subject to approval by European Parliament. The Commission acts with complete political independence. It is assisted by a civil service made up of 36 "Directorates-General" (DGs) and services, based mainly in Brussels and Luxembourg.

European Council: The European Council consists of the heads of state or government of the EU countries, together with its President and the President of the Commission. It defines the overall general political direction and priorities of the European Union.

European External Action Service (EEAS): Abroad, the EU is represented by a network of 136 EU Delegations, which have a similar function to those of an embassy. This is being coordinated by the European External Action Service which serves as a foreign ministry and diplomatic corps for the EU under the authority of the High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (HR), a post created by the Treaty of Lisbon.

European Parliament: The European Parliament is the elected body that represents the EU's citizens. It currently seats 751 national representatives. Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are elected every five years. As an equal partner with the Council of the European Union, the European Parliament passes the majority of EU laws.

European Union legislation: EU law is an independent legal system which takes precedence over national legislation.

  • Primary legislation: Primary legislation includes the treaties of the European Union and other agreements having similar status. Primary legislation is agreed by direct negotiation between EU countries’ governments and defines the role and responsibilities of the EU institutions.
  • Secondary legislation: Secondary legislation is based on the treaties and may take the following forms:

Regulations, which are directly applicable and binding in all EU countries, without the need for any national implementing legislation.

Directives, which bind the EU countries as to the objectives to be achieved within a certain time-limit, while the choice of form and means to be used to the national authorities.

Decisions, which are binding in all their aspects for those to whom they are addressed. They do not require national implementing legislation. A decision may be addressed to any or all EU countries, to enterprises or to individuals.

Recommendations and opinions, which are not binding.

Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA): The FRA is an EU body tasked with collecting and analysing data on fundamental rights with reference to, in principle, all rights listed in the Charter of Fundamental Rights. The FRA's primary methods of operation are surveys, reports, provision of expert assistance to EU bodies, member states, and EU candidate countries and potential candidate countries, and raising awareness about fundamental rights. The FRA is based in Vienna, Austria, and was formed in 2007.

European Union legislation search for term

EU law is an independent legal system which takes precedence over national legislation. (sub-item of European Union (EU))

  • Primary legislation: Primary legislation includes the treaties of the European Union and other agreements having similar status. Primary legislation is agreed by direct negotiation between EU countries’ governments and defines the role and responsibilities of the EU institutions.
  • Secondary legislation: Secondary legislation is based on the treaties and may take the following forms:

Regulations, which are directly applicable and binding in all EU countries, without the need for any national implementing legislation.

Directives, which bind the EU countries as to the objectives to be achieved within a certain time-limit, while the choice of form and means to be used to the national authorities.

Decisions, which are binding in all their aspects for those to whom they are addressed. They do not require national implementing legislation. A decision may be addressed to any or all EU countries, to enterprises or to individuals.

Recommendations and opinions, which are not binding.
 

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