New funding program for data-collection on violence in Europe and Central Asia

ILGA-Europe launches an opportunity for funding to collect and document data on cases of violence against the LGBTI communities in Europe and Central Asia. We will support proposals focusing on collecting evidence that provides advocacy insights on the situations around institutionalised violence as well as tackling lack of support to the victims of domestic violence based on their SOGIESC.

ILGA-Europe invites organisations and initiative groups from the region of Europe and Central Asia to join our program aimed to support the LGBTI movement in its Documentation and Advocacy work.

This year we offer an opportunity to apply for funding to collect and document data on cases of violence against the LGBTI communities in Europe and Central Asia. We will support proposals focusing on collecting evidence that provides advocacy insights on the situations around institutionalised violence as well as tackling lack of support to the victims of domestic violence based on their SOGIESC.

This activity is launched under the priorities of Pathways 2, 4 and 5 of ILGA-Europe’s Strategic Framework for the period of 2019 – 2023. The grants will be supported from ILGA-Europe’s own funds, coming from private donations.

Deadline for applications: 15 November 2022, 23.59 CET (Brussels time).

Themes of the call

Through this program we intend to support 8-10 organisations/initiatives in one of the following thematic areas, which are currently requiring attention from the advocacy perspective and yet do have sufficient evidence documented.

  1. Discrimination and violence by police and other criminal justice institutions  

ILGA-Europe members across our region report that LGBTI people, particularly LGBTI people facing multiple and/or intersectional marginalisation, are frequently subjected to human rights violations by police, even when reporting cases of hate crime. In addition, we often hear that the police and other institutions of criminal justice avoid properly investigating cases of violence against LGBTI people and brining perpetrators to justice, even when the country has adopted a legislative framework that provides for LGBTI-specific grounds for protection. However, when we report these instances to international institutions, to explain that this is a systemic issue which needs specific solutions, we often do not have the quantitative or systematic data to back up our claims.

2. Access of victims of domestic violence[1] to justice and victims support services

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, ILGA-Europe has been working on domestic violence against LGBTI people in our region. We continue hearing that LGBTI victims of domestic violence face specific challenges when attempting to access justice and support services. Negative experiences in dealing with government agencies or social support services because of their SOGIESC, can contribute to LGBTI victims feeling concerned they will not be understood or believed when disclosing abuse from their partners or family members. When LGBTI victims report abuse to law enforcement officials or social services, they can still face additional barriers to getting the necessary support to leave an abusive relationship or environment. Despite widespread domestic violence against LGBTI people and issues in accessing victims support services and justice, these issues remain invisible in official statistics as EU member states fail to record domestic violence against LGBTI people comprehensively and systematically. 

The specific goal and work that can be supported under this program:

The program is aimed at supporting collection of violence cases against the LGBTI communities through allocation of grants to organisations for collecting evidence of (1) institutionalised violence and (2) refusal to and/or lack of support for the victims of domestic violence because of their SOGIESC. Below are some details of what can be monitored and documented:

  1. Discrimination and violence by police and other criminal justice institutions

We encourage applicants to look at human rights violations, not just among the police but also among other institutions of justice (prosecution, judiciary, defence), who either commit violations or refuse to sanction or investigate violence when it is their duty to do so. We encourage quantitative data collection to be disaggregated on intersecting identities such as race, migrant status, disability, age and gender, in order to show how certain LGBTI people are more exposed to violence, and to help activists have data to forge strong alliances with other marginalised groups who are working to tackle institutional violence in criminal justice. Below are some examples of cases for documentation:

1. When someone reports a case of discrimination, hate crime or hate speech with a SOGIESC motive and receives LGBTI-phobia from police/investigators, at the moment of reporting and/or during the investigation process.

2. Denial of treatment or mistreatment of LGBTI people in medical settings.

3. Systemic lack of prosecution in SOGIESC related cases, especially when the legal framework exists (i.e. non-implementation of the anti-discrimination or hate crime/hate speech law which has SOGIESC as aggravating factors).

2. Access of victims of domestic violence to justice and victims support services

As disaggregated data is essential to truly understanding the prevalence of domestic violence against LGBTI people and access to support services and enables informed decisions on where and how to target legislative protection, funding and other support, we are calling for project proposals aimed at quantitative data collection on barriers to access of victims of domestic violence to justice and victims support services. Below are some examples of cases for documentation:

1. When LGBTI person is suffering from domestic violence on the hands of partner or family member but does not report to the police because of lack of legal protection at the national level. For example, a person suffering intimate partner violence and living in same sex partnership cannot report intimate partner violence because national legislation defines intimate partner violence as violence experienced in different-sex partnerships (male perpetrators and female victims).

2. Denial of access to shelters for trans or male victims of domestic violence, in particular access for trans women to shelter for female victims of domestic violence.

3. Limited access to information. For instance, when LGBTI youth or children experience physical, psychological or economic harm at the hands of parent or legal guardian but they do not have access to hotlines to receive information on how and where to seek help.  

IMPORTANT! Submitted applications should concentrate on documentation of ONE type of violence: institutionalised OR domestic.

Budget and scope

Under this program ILGA-Europe will provide grants to LGBTI organisations and initiative groups in budget sizes depending on their annual budgets, organisational experience in Monitoring and Documentation, as well previous experience of implementing projects under the re-granting schemes of ILGA-Europe, including the Documentation and Advocacy fund. Depending on the organisational profile, applicants shall submit their proposals under one of the tiers below:

TierExpected budget of grantMinimum eligibility requirements under each tier (applicants must meet all the bullet points):
Tier IEUR 5.000-10.000 (around 5 grants) Newly established LGBTI groups: registered or not registered and have recently started organising themselves Non-registered applicants need to identify a fiscal sponsor Minimal or no experience in monitoring and documentation as well as grants implementation
Tier IIEUR 10.000-15.000 (around 5 grants) LGBTI organisations registered as legal entities Applicants have previous experience of implementing projects under ILGA-Europe’s re-granting schemes Applicants have already some or in-depth experience in documentation of human rights violations cases.

Funding amounts will be determined on the basis of the scope of the project proposal, taking into consideration factors such as geographical scope, capacity to absorb funding and costs of living in the concerned country.

Useful information, links, and tools

ILGA-Europe are open to support grants that have already documentation systems in place as well as those who want to set up a system for documentation of human rights violation cases. Applicants are free to choose the methodology for documenting violence cases. The experience of the ILGA-Europe work in previous years demonstrated that implementation of such projects allows selected applicants to develop data collection skills on cases of institutionalised or domestic violence cases in Europe and Central Asia. In case if an applicant requires additional information to decide on methodology here you can find useful information at https://www.huridocs.org/our-manuals/ or https://uwazi.io/ . You can also get in touch with ILGA-Europe to ask for specific tools.

Under this call ILGA-Europe will support documentation methods and reporting techniques which may include on-line reporting, face-to-face interviews or interviews by phone. ILGA-Europe will also support the publication of the report to be produced as a result of the project. At minimal, all projects should include the collection of data and the production of a report on the basis of the data collected.

Application forms shall include a description of the planned activities and of the chosen reporting methodology. Your proposals will be evaluated taking into account the capacity of your organisation to implement the project.

Information on the advocacy plans that your organisation intends to carry out on the basis of the produced report will be considered as an asset for your application. Organizations are also encouraged to demonstrate how this project will support the building of internal documentation skills in relation to documentation of situations around the case of institutionalised or domestic violence.

Information on your organisation’s plans to sustain in the long term the reporting and monitoring processes put in place thanks to the grant will be considered as an asset for your application.

ILGA-Europe’s staff remains available to facilitate information exchange on methodological tools used by its successful applicants. You can also find information about most recent documentation projects at ILGA-Europe webpage.

Applications should define vocabulary clearly and use it consistently throughout their proposal and project. It is important to clearly identify the indicators you intend to use and how you will gather, classify and measure the information to be collected. For guidance see HURIDOCS and UNHR sources.

Eligibility criteria

All applications will be assessed based on the following criteria

  • Under this Call, the maximum duration of projects cannot exceed 12 months and projects shall be completed on or before December 31, 2023. Proposed minimum duration of projects is 8 months
  • ONLY applications from LGBTI organisations in the European region and Central Asia[2] are eligible. A list of the eligible countries can be found here
  • The totals of the budget should fall into one of tiers described above  
  • The submitted application should concentrate on documentation of ONE type of violence: institutionalised OR domestic. Applications including both will be considered as ineligible
  • Documentation of violence cases in the period of project implementation (2023) as well as cases happened in 2021 and 2022.

The selected applications should:

  • Provide a clear methodology and outline what the objectives, added-value and expected outcomes are;
  • Allow for the documentation of new evidence on LGBTI discriminatory practices in documentation;
  • Enhance data collection skills on violence cases against LGBTI communities;
  • Clearly indicate the language of the final product (advocacy report) and other outputs;

The deadline for the applications submission is 15 November 2022, 23.59 CET (Brussels time). Decisions on grants awarded will be communicated in December 2022.

Due to capacity and funding limitations NO applications from outside Europe and Central Asia, or submitted after the deadline will be accepted.

You can submit your application in English or ask any questions to ILGA-Europe’s Senior Programmes and Policy Officer Boris Balanețkii: boris@ilga-europe.org.


[1] “domestic violence” means all acts of violence that result in, or are likely to result in, physical, sexual, psychological or economic harm or suffering, that occur within the family or domestic unit, irrespective of biological or legal family ties, or between former or current spouses or partners, whether or not the offender shares or has shared a residence with the victim

[2] Countries-members of the Council of Europe as well as Russia, Belarus, Kosovo, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan.

Source

Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

See also

Blog

The timeline leading from anti-LGBTI Instagram posts to the “honour killing” of an LGBTI activist in Azerbaijan

The cousin of LGBTI activist Avaz Hafizli has been jailed for his horrific murder, which came on foot of protests against hateful Instagram posts by the Instagram star, Sevinj Huseynova, who called for the physical ‘removal’ of sexual minorities and trans people from Azerbaijan. The trial was a travesty of justice, according to activists.
read more
News

European Court Rules Against Armenia Inaction in Anti-LGBTI Hate Crime Case

The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that authorities in Armenia failed to protect an LGBT bar owner and activist from homophobic physical and verbal […]
read more
Report

Integrating LGBTI inclusive Gender Based Violence risk prevention, reduction and mitigation in the context of war in Ukraine

The ongoing war in Ukraine has resulted in the need for immediate action to address the needs both of a significant population of Ukrainians fleeing […]
read more
Podcast

The Frontline: Working Alongside Businesses to Shift Attitudes

We’re looking at this through the lens of one very successful partnership and campaign, between Mermaids, a UK organisation helping trans, nonbinary and gender diverse […]
read more
Podcast

The Frontline: How Businesses Can Support LGBTI Equality

In this, the second episode of our new mini-series exploring the opportunities and challenges that come with businesses supporting LGBTI equality, we’re taking a closer look […]
read more
Podcast

The Frontline: Making the Business Case for LGBTI Equality

Over the past few years, more and more companies have been engaging with LGBTI rights and equality, from putting inclusive employment policies in place, to […]
read more
Podcast

The Frontline: The Private Sector and LGBTI Equality – Mini-series Introduction

With the war in Ukraine and the Russian threat to democracy it has intensified, now more than ever we need to be working together across […]
read more
Blog

The 5 trending attacks on the fundamental rights of LGBTI people in the EU

Right now, as the war on Ukraine escalates, democracy, human rights and equality matter more than ever in Europe. In our submission to the European Commission’s annual Rule of Law report, we’ve identified key trends in the systematic attacks on the rights of LGBTI people across EU member states.
read more
Blog

A Marathon, not a sprint: how we’re responding to the invasion of Ukraine

In the past week, since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, the global response has been massive, alongside a great number of organisations working with […]
read more
News

Support for LGBTI People in Ukraine

As is the world, at ILGA-Europe we are continually assessing the rapidly developing situation in Ukraine and the region, and in particular for LGBTI people.  […]
read more
Blog

As often well-funded right-wing forces rise, one in three LGBTI organisations operate on less than 55 euro a day

ILGA-Europe’s latest report shows that one in three LGBTI organisations in Europe and Central Asia are working with a budget under 20,000 euro per year ­– that’s just under 55 euro a day — all the while facing and responding to the rise of often well-funded anti-LGBTI forces and their effect on people’s daily lives. And that’s just a small part of the bigger picture.
read more
Press Release

Rising challenges for LGBTI organisations in Europe and Central Asia, new report finds

A survey of LGBTI organisations across Europe and Central Asia finds they face significant challenges in the face of growing anti-LGBTI forces, and the ongoing […]
read more
Report

Overview of ILGA-Europe’s finances in 2021

In the financial year 2021 ILGA-Europe obtained and recognised €3,322,339 in revenues, which is approximately a 6% increase from the 2020 revenues. The share of […]
read more
Report

Funding to Meet Changing Realities: LGBTI Organisations on the State of Funding in Europe and Central Asia

This report is intended as a resource for donors and prospective donors, including governments, to inform them in their grantmaking efforts to support LGBTI organisations […]
read more
Blog

Alarming new research shows how LGBTI people are affected every day by inequality

Recent data shows that LGBTI young people perceive the labour market with fear and that most of LGBTI youth living with their families have experienced violence in different parts of Europe. These are among the alarming facts related to the impact of inequality and oppression in LGBTI communities, as identified through ILGA-Europe’s No One Left Behind initiative.
read more
News

Commission includes LGBTI people in initiative to tackle hate crime and hate speech across the European Union

The European Commission has put forward a legal initiative to extend the list of EU crimes to include hate speech, both online and offline, and hate crime, with clear understanding that LGBTI people must be protected.
read more
News

Open letter to President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen

ILGA-Europe,  OII Europe, and TGEU urge the European Commission to acknowledge the existing prevalence of the violence and incitement to discrimination against LGBTI people, through naming SOGIGESC explicitly as protected grounds in the upcoming EU-level hate crime and hate speech legal initiative.
read more
Blog

Say Their Names: The trans and gender diverse people whose murders were reported in Europe and Central Asia last year

The murders of 375 trans and gender-diverse people were reported between October 2020 and September 2021, according to the latest Trans Murder Monitoring (TMM) update, and 2021 is set to be the deadliest year for trans communities since TGEU began collecting data. We say the names of those whose lives were cut short in our region, with a view towards a world where all trans people can live in equality, freedom and peace.
read more
Report

Poland Anti-LGBTI Hate Timeline

Over the past number of years, LGBTI people have come under increasing attack from ruling politicians, religious leaders and other public figures in Poland. This […]
read more
Blog

How LGBTI rights are being used for political manipulation in Europe, and why that’s something everyone should be worried about

Commissioner for Human Rights, Dunja Mijatovic has issued a powerful comment, clarifying that LGBTI people are being used as a political pawns by ultra-conservative leaders in more and more European countries, and that in turn the human rights and freedom of everyone are being undermined. Here’s what she had to say.
read more
Report

LBTI women in sport: violence, discrimination, and lived experiences

In March 2021, a coalition of European networks working on LGBTI rights and including ILGA-Europe, EL*C, TGEU, OII Europe and EGLSF submitted to the Parliamentary […]
read more
Report

Funding for LGBTI activism in Europe and Central Asia

Priorities and access to resources ILGA-Europe wanted to learn more about the LGBTI movements’ priorities in the rapidly-changing political, social and cultural environment we all […]
read more
News

Responding to anti-LGBTI forces: ILGA-Europe’s call for project proposals

We have launched a re-granting programme to strengthen the capacities of LGBTI organisations in Europe to achieve change in the current landscape of rising anti-LGBTI forces.
read more
Report

Partnerships for LGBTI equality

Over the past few years, ILGA-Europe have been pleased to partner with an increasing number of companies, large and small, leading the way in support […]
read more
News

Joint manifesto for an inclusive and comprehensive eu gender-based violence policy for all

Together with the under-signed organisations we call on the European Union to adopt a forward-thinking and truly inclusive approach to gender-based violence – that leaves […]
read more
Press Release

The European Court of Human Rights finds Croatian response to violent homophobic attack fosters impunity for hate crime

A judgement issued today by the European Court of Human Rights finds that the response of Croatian authorities to a hate crime against a lesbian woman was “particularly destructive of fundamental human rights”.
read more
Blog

“It feels as if we’re trapped with our abusers.” Ukrainian activist Anna Sharyhina tells the story of unhindered anti-LGBTI abuse in Kharkiv

Throughout 2020, LGBTI activists have been harassed, intimidated and threatened by well-known far right groups in Ukraine, while police and local authorities turn a blind eye. Here is activist Anna Sharyhina’s alarming story, and how you can lend her and other LGBTI Ukrainian activists your support.
read more
Blog

Trans Day of Remembrance 2020: Honoring the 350 lives cut short this year

Every November 20, on Trans Day of Remembrance (TDoR), we remember those whose lives have been taken away through transphobic violence. This year’s Trans Murder Monitoring report from Transgender Europe shows the highest number of annual killings since the report was first published 12 years ago.
read more
Blog

No One Left Behind: A Fund to tackle LGBTI socioeconomic inequalities

Early in June, ILGA-Europe launched the ‘No One Left Behind’ fund, an initiative to tackle persisting socioeconomic inequalities that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 crisis. Read on to find out what it is, why we launched it and how we went about awarding 25 grants.
read more
News

Joint Statement: End hate speech and targeted attacks against LGBTI people in Turkey

We call on Turkey to respect, guarantee, protect and fulfil the fundamental rights of the LGBTI community without discrimination as enshrined by its Constitution and equality article therein (article 10), and ratified by human rights treaty bodies.
read more